Derby Cathedral has been highly commended for its work in restoring the cathedral roof in the Construction Project of the Year category at the East Midlands Property Dinner 2018.

The award follows the renewal of the nave roof after design faults 50 years ago meant the lead had split causing leaks.  Repairs included a new lead roof, stonework, coping stone, balustrade repairs, strengthening rotten roof joists and the provision of overflows. Two roof access hatches were installed to allow access, to the parapet gutters for maintenance.

The project, which took nine months to complete, was managed by Rachel Morris, Chief Executive at Derby Cathedral. The work also included a huge, temporary roof being built over the nave to protect the interior and visitors during the renovation.

Mrs Morris said: “Derby Cathedral is delighted to have been Highly Recommended for this project.  It was only possible with funding from the ‘First World War Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund’, and a great project team including architect Robert Kilgour, main contractors Midland Stonemasonry and subcontractors Tamworth Scaffolding, to all of whom Derby Cathedral Chapter is very grateful.

“The professionalism and commitment of all the contractors means that the roof is watertight and fit for purpose, ensuring that Derby Cathedral is safe and dry for the people of Derby and visitors to enjoy for decades to come.”

The Construction Project of the Year category rewards innovative and challenging construction projects that have been delivered on time and to budget in the East Midlands.

Derby Cathedral is a Church of England ‘parish church cathedral’ and was an important medieval collegiate church.  All that remains of this is the 1530s tower which dominates the City’s skyline and holds the oldest ring of ten bells in the world. The nave was completed by James Gibbs in 1723 and is a symbol of Derby’s place in the Enlightenment at the start of the Industrial Revolution. 

It became a cathedral in 1927.  The building sits at the top of Iron Gate in the award-winning Cathedral Quarter, close to the World Heritage site including the Silk Mill Museum next to the River Derwent.

#FollowTheStar is the Church of England’s 2018 Christmas campaign.

Thousands of Christmas services and events will be taking place in churches all over the country in the run up to Christmas.

The campaign will serve a number of purposes: 1) to remind everyone that Christmas doesn't end on Christmas day - in fact, that is just the start! 2) To encourage people to remember that their church is there all year round, not just at Christmas. 3) To guide people to the A Church Near You website so they can sdiscover more about our churches to experience and explore. So now's a good time to check your church's details are up to date!

Find out more here.


"For many of us, Christmas brings up so many emotions, memories and expectations. We have one nativity story, but it can seem like we all have very different Christmases.

"For you it might be a time of joy and togetherness. Or perhaps it’s all about planning and to-do lists. Many others can find it a sad and lonely time – nagged by the feeling that your Christmas is not like those ‘perfect’ ones we see in the media.

"But just like the unexpected assortment of people who were invited to meet the baby Jesus, #FollowTheStar doesn’t ask you to be perfect. It says: come just as you are to take the life-changing Christmas journey."

Archbishops Justin Welby & John Sentamu

Many of our churchyards are known for being a haven for wildlife - but it seems our bell towers and outbuildings are hotbeds for hibernation.

Ken Orpe is the butterfly recorder for Butterfly Conservation in Derbyshire. He writes:

"Due to the very hot weather many Peacock and Small Tortoiseshell butterflies have gone into hibernation very early this year.

"In fact, a lady from Denby checked out the bell room at her local church last week and found 25 butterflies hibernating there – 10 Peacocks & 15 Small Tortoiseshells!

"I wonder whether any of your colleagues at the various churches in Derby and Derbyshire area have noticed an increase of this early hibernation recently?"

The very hot weather in July 2018 was too much for the coloured butterflies to withstand – they usually fly between 10° C and 23° C so a week of 30° C was too hot for them!  

The white butterflies kept on flying because they reflect the heat (rather than absorb it) so we were seeing only white butterflies on our buddleias as the Peacocks and Small Tortoiseshells decided to go into hibernation very early – they don't usually do that until mid to late September when the weather cools down.

All in all, this summer has been quite extraordinary – some butterflies have really taken advantage of it such as the Wall Brown in the Peak District where it is usually up to 5° C cooler than in Derby, whereas other species just wanted to get out of the heat!

Have you seen hibernating butterflies in your belfry?

Please, let us know (and take some photos!)

Children and groups across the Diocese have received their Bishop's Badge awards from Bishop Alastair and Bishop Jan.

These awards are a version of the Bishop's Badge awards that were extended to Church Schools to mark the 90th anniversary of the diocese. Schools were invited to nominate the child in their school who they feel best embodies the Diocesan Church School value of the Year, community, in an age-appropriate way.

Nineteen individuals were nominated for a Bishop’s Badge from fifteen different church schools.

>> Pictures from the award presentation at Derby Cathedral (on Flickr)

>> Pictures from the award presentation at St John's Tideswell (on Flickr)

Several children were nominated for their work raising funds for charity – Rosie baked and sold cakes to buy mosquito nets, Joshua and Lily raised money to support two different linked slum schools in Kolkata, Maiya supports Sheffield Hospital Charities, Esme helped fund the rescuing of rabbits while Ryan supported the work of the Stroke Association after his Grandma died and Daisy and Tyler both support the Red Cross shop in Matlock to make people smile.

Helping other children fit into school and make friends and giving up their playtime to help and support other children and staff were the reasons Tillie, Liam, Millie, Rufus, Matthew, Riley and Lily Rose were put forward for an award.

Lauren and Ruby were chosen because of their talent in spotting, naming, encouraging and nominating for awards other children who embody the school’s values.

Ruby volunteers with Derbyshire Volunteer Police Cadets, in residential homes and at a Christmas soup lunch. Katie used her first aid skills to save her Grandma’s life when she was choking at a restaurant.

Rosie and Corey are involved in waste recycling projects and litter picking and Amelie brings beauty to the community through the school gardening club and flower festivals .

These awards were presented by Bishop Alastair at a special celebration at Derby Cathedral and by Bishop Jan at St John's Tideswell at services planned and led by children from Longford C of E Primary School at the Cathedral and Bishop Pursglove C of E Primary School in Tideswell.

Tideswell Badge awards

Bishop's Badge School awards in Tideswell

Both schools planned very imaginative and creative worship using various media and resources including a live fig tree, golden magic pennies, a values quiz, large paper people, action prayers and songs and even a Tibetan prayer bowl to help us explore the theme of Christian community in our worship.

Alongside the awards for individuals, six separate projects received awards. Bishop Pursglove C of E Primary School had been doing some joint partnership work with a local residential home including  the children sharing work about WW2 in the residential home and the elderly people visiting school for an art exhibition.

Darley Churchtown C of E Primary School have also been working with the elderly, sharing artwork, crafts and music with dementia patients in their Ringing the Changes Project  through the auspices of First Taste Charity as well as running a community café to raise funds for their local church.

Newbold C of E School have formed their own Early help Team to offer family support to all these needing support along the lines of play therapy, emotional literacy, pet therapy and access to the Foodbank. St Luke’s C of E Primary School have been giving posies of flowers and gratitude messages to members of the community they consider to be unsung heroes.

Carsington and Hopton C of E primary School have been raising funds to buy resources and uniforms for their link school in Kolkata and one of their teachers Mrs Tinkler has written a phonics teaching manual which fifteen of the schools in Kolkata are now using each day.

Following the success of these new awards, we shall be inviting awards for next year for children and projects embodying the Diocesan Church School value of hope.


When the Diocese of Derby was founded in 1927, Bishop Edmund Courtenay Pearce – the first Bishop of Derby – arranged for a medal to be struck and copies presented to distinguished members of the Diocese and to all those being confirmed in that year.

In more recent years, Bishop Alastair arranged for a replica of this medal to be minted and mounted in the form of a badge to be awarded to lay people across the diocese each year to acknowledge outstanding service to the mission and ministry of the church.

To mark the 90th Anniversary of the Diocese of Derby, these awards were extended to Church Schools who were invited to nominate the child in their school who they feel best embodies the Diocesan Church School value of the Year, community,  in an age-appropriate way.

There was also a category for projects where schools were creating and building community and these projects were awarded a Certificate of Excellence.

 


The Diocese of Derby paid tribute to Bishop Alastair and wished him and his wife, Caroline, a fond farewell at a service at Derby Cathedral on Saturday.

Enjoy some of the pictures from the service - and see lots more on Flickr!

 

The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, has paid tribute to The Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern, Bishop of Derby, who retires at the end of August after 13 years in the Diocese.

In a speech delivered at General Synod, the Archbishop talked about Bishop Alastair's commitment to the Diocese of Derby in the deaneries and in schools.

archbishop of york john sentamuArchbishop John (pictured right) said: "Alastair, you have overseen the development of new ‘super deaneries’ in the diocese where the area deans are paid half-time in that role (with the other half of the stipend for their parish ministry).

"I understand it has been a joy to see the eight area deans grow into their leadership roles and plan mission and ministry locally and contextually.

"You have spoken time and time again of the mission opportunities our church schools afford and have built up a first-rate team under an outstanding Director of Education."

Archbishop John also cited Bishop Alastair's work in the fight against human trafficking: "Of course, Alastair we are all impressed with the work you have done to highlight the horror that is modern slavery and the huge amount of effort you have given to leading on this area not only for the Church of England but for all denominations to ensure this matter is taken seriously."

He concluded by saying: "Your vast wisdom and deep spiritual leadership will be greatly missed both in the Diocese and in the life of the national church."

Read Archbishop John's tribute in full

Chesterfield Parish Church is running a Singing Summer School for young people aged 7-11 from 25 to 27 July.

Each day starts at 9.30am and ends at 3.30pm. 

All boys and girls aged between seven and eleven are welcome and there is no requirement to have any prior singing or music-making experience.

Drinks will be available throughout each day, but all participating children should bring a packed lunch. 

The Summer School costs £30 for the three days for one child. Each additional child costs £20. 

The church's professional music staff will tailor the tuition to meet the needs of different ages and abilities, through a programme of fun and engaging coaching.

The group singing sessions will be interspersed with an exciting programme of fun social activities, such as a bell ringing workshop and a treasure hunt. 

The course will conclude with a short performance for parents, friends and supporters. This will be followed by refreshments for everyone. 

Singing has been a big part of what happens at the Crooked Spire for centuries.

The church maintains excellent boys' and girls' choirs, trained by professional musicians, who coach the young people to perform at high standards. 

In addition to providing music at the church's choral services, the choirs provide outstanding educational and social opportunities to local young people.

After the summer school, participants have the option of joining one of the church's regular choirs, but there's no obligation to join the full-time choir.

The purpose of the course is to give the young people an insight into singing, build their confidence and have fun along the way.   

If your child is interested in the Summer School, please phone 01246 206506 to make a booking. If you have any questions about the Summer School, please get in touch: contact@crookedspire.org

chesterfield st mary

Derby Cathedral will host a farewell service for Bishop Alastair at 3.30 pm on Saturday, 14 July. All are welcome to come along.

The service will be a celebration of Bishop Alastair’s 13 years in the Diocese of Derby and reflect other aspects of his work, such as the fight against modern slavery.

It will feature readings from HM Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire, Mr William Tucker, and Canon Caroline Redfern, Bishop Alastair’s wife. 

Tributes will be given by some of the Bishop’s present and former colleagues and associates from the Diocese and beyond. The Bishop himself will deliver the sermon.

The Dean of Derby, the Very Revd Dr Stephen Hance, said: “We are very much looking forward to gathering with Bishop Alastair and so many others to give thanks for his time as Bishop of Derby and to pray God’s blessing on all that lies ahead.

“We hope many from across the Diocese will come to make this a truly memorable occasion.”

The cathedral will have visual displays from children in Derbyshire’s Church of England schools as they show their appreciation, and from the deaneries (administrative areas) in the Diocese of Derby.

All are welcome to come along to the service and to join us for refreshments and ice cream afterwards.

Bishop Alastair has ordained eight new deacons in Derby Cathedral.

The eight men and women have begun ministry as deacons in parish churches across the Diocese of Derby following a service on Sunday, 1 July in Derby Cathedral.

The special service was lead by the Bishop of Derby, the Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern.

The new deacons include a former IT project manager, an international business director and former teachers.

Rod Prince, Amanda Marshall, Bruce Johnson, Jan Hutchinson, Caro Hemmings, Joel Bird, Carolyn Baker and Jill Hancock will now start a three-to-four-year post of curate, training alongside experienced vicars.

Deacons are normally ordained as priests after a year.

For more pictures, please see us on Flickr.

 

 

Around 5,000 clay figures, depicting players and spectators of Ashbourne’s Shrovetide football game, have gone on display in St Oswald’s church in the town.

The ‘Our Game’ project, launched by Ashbourne Festival and The Clayrooms, is the culmination of four months’ work involving more than 2,000 school children and hundreds of adults from communities in and around Ashbourne.

Between them they have created the individual small clay figures, which have been installed in the church and will remain there until September.

The figures include players in the hug, followers of the game, mums carrying babies and even some ‘out-of-town’ characters, such as Gandalf and ET. Each figure is unique and has its own character.

The Revd Duncan Ballard, vicar of St Oswald’s said: “In a fast-changing, busy world some communities struggle to retain their identity; however, Ashbourne is a place where tradition, community and pride come together every year for Shrovetide Football.

“It’s therefore very fitting that the clay figures, symbolically representing the whole of the town, have found a home surrounding the high altar at St Oswald’s church.

“St Oswald’s church is delighted to be a part of this project, demonstrating that the church is here for everyone, and that our doors will always be wide open.”

This ambitious project was developed for the Ashbourne Festival in partnership with The Clayrooms pottery in Ashbourne. Local ceramicists and teachers, Helen Cammiss and Sarah Heaton, who founded the pottery last year, originated the idea for ‘Our Game’.

 

st oswald clay figures 6895 full res

The 5,000 small figures have been created by schoolchildren, local residents and visitors during school visits, ‘pop-up’ workshops and in The Clayrooms studio.

It represents the sense of community involvement and inclusiveness and, of course, the pride in celebrating ‘Our Game’ shown by every maker of every figure.

To top off the centrepiece of the ‘hug’, a special ‘Our Game’ ball has been painted by Shrovetide ball painter Tim Baker.

ballot 253360 unsplash

Elections for the new, three-year session of the Diocesan Synod are now taking place.

The Diocesan Synod is the main forum for discussion on Diocesan policy and its members are also members of the Diocesan Board of Finance which deals with financial matters relating to the Diocese.

If you would like to be nominated for election to Diocesan Synod please contact a Deanery Synod member in your parish, or your incumbent, if you are a member of the laity, and you will be guided through the process.

Any confirmed person who is on the electoral roll of a parish within the Diocese is eligible for nomination, although it is the membership of the deanery synods which is the electorate.

Clergy who are members of a deanery synod are eligible for nomination also.

Nominations close on 22nd June, elections will take place by 10th July and the new Diocesan Synod comes in to being on 1st August.

Video courtesy of BBC East Midlands Today

Drivers are being encouraged to join an unprecedented national information-gathering campaign launched by the Church of England and the Catholic Church in England and Wales aimed at eradicating modern slavery in hand car washes.

Anti-slavery campaigners and other key agencies, including the police and councils, are backing the Safe Car Wash App, launched by The Clewer Initiative, the Church of England’s campaign against modern slavery, and the Santa Marta Group, the Catholic Church’s anti-slavery project.

From Monday, 4 June the Safe Car Wash app can be downloaded for free on to Apple and Android devices.

Users can open the app when they are at a car wash and pinpoint their exact location using GPS.

They will be then taken through a series of indicators of modern slavery.

They range from practical details - such as whether workers have suitable protective clothing - to behavioural clues, such as whether they appear withdrawn.

If the answers indicate a high likelihood, users will be directed to the Modern Slavery Helpline.

Get the app: Android Play Store | iOS App Store

Data from the app will be anonymised and shared with the National Crime Agency (NCA) and the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA).

Clergy will also be asked to raise awareness of the campaign in sermons and Sunday School lessons and hold events to publicise the app.

Estimates now suggest that there are more than 18,000 in Britain’s high streets, at the sides of motorways, and on abandoned garage forecourts.

Many are run as legitimate businesses, but some exploit, force and threaten their workers, trapping them in modern slavery.

No reliable data currently exists as to the scale of the problem, with the result that subsequent responses have proved inadequate.

Kevin Hyland, Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner said: “The value of this app is that in addition to immeasurably improving the lives of victims of modern slavery being cruelly exploited in car washes today, it also empowers a community to act.”

Professor Zoe Trodd, Director of the Rights Lab, a University of Nottingham Beacon of Excellence, said: “Car washes are completely unregulated territory and we don’t know how big the sector is, how many hand car washes operate or how many persons are registered to work in them. This citizen engagement in data collection is a powerful technique with potential for mapping other vulnerable services such as nail bars.”

The App is also endorsed by the National Police Chiefs’ Council, the Local Government Association and the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.

When it comes to getting married, not every bride can tie the knot in their first choice of church. One lucky bride who did is Kelly Hewitt.

As did her mum. And her grandmother. And her great grandma and three previous generations before her.

It’s understood that no fewer than seven generations of Kelly’s family have taken their vows in Tissington parish church - St Mary’s. For some reason, brides-to-be just seem to want to get married there.

The small village of Tissington is nestled in the western part of the Diocese - around 160 people live in the parish as a whole (Tissington and Lea Hall). Kelly was born and baptised there before tying the knot there in 2017.

“I’ve always been part of the church and would not have wanted to marry anywhere else,” she said.

“In fact, I remember telling Chris, ‘if you don’t marry me in Tissington church, I won’t marry you at all!’”

But as well as being her parish church, St Mary’s holds another special significance for Kelly.

Sadly, Kelly’s dad, Paul Greatorex, died suddenly when she was only 9 – and he is buried at the church.

She recalls: “After he died, Mum wanted to get something for the church where they had got married.

She decided on a kneeler and an Advent wreath and I used the kneeler at my wedding. “The vicar, Carollyn McDonald, then took the wreath and placed a lighted candle in it in remembrance of my dad.”

It was Kelly’s granddad, Kenneth Unwin, who also married in St Mary’s in 1966, that gave her away – so for Kelly, it was like the church had brought them all together again: “It was very emotional – though I managed to hold it together!

“It was the most lovely day and it really felt like Dad was present.”

For Kelly’s mum, Wendy, it was an emotional day, too: “The memories came flooding back, but I felt really proud of the way I’d brought her up and that she married in the same church as me.

“I would always tell people to marry in church. It’s part of my faith and, to me, you’re not getting married unless you’re in a church.”

You can read more about Kelly and Wendy in the first issue of Together Magazine - available free in churches in the Diocese of Derby from 1st May.

Tissington church interior

Inside Tissington church

What have you been up to this month?

There is always so much going on in our Diocese - from flower festivals to fun days.

If you have some great pictures of an event in your parish or deanery, then why not share them with us so we can add them to our gallery?

Send your images and a little text about the event to: communications@derby.anglican.org

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Guidelines for images:

Ideally, we should have written permission from anyone who can be identified before using their photo on line. However, this is not always practical.

Children: Before we use an image showing a child (ie someone under 18) who can be identified, we must have written permission from the parent or legal guardian. Permission is not usually needed if the child cannot be identified - eg if they have their back to the camera. Some youth organisations and schools will already have parental permission as part of their overall safeguarding policies and this will suffice as long as ALL the children in the photo are covered by the permission held. Please check with the group's leader or teacher beforehand.

Adults: At church and parish events, permission should be obtained from adults who can be identified when the photo is taken (verbal permission will usually suffice). We should never use pictures of people who prefer not to have their pictures on display to the public.

OldBramptonRingers RingingChamber brightChurches across the Diocese of Derby are recruiting new bell ringers as part of a nationwide campaign to honour the ringers who lost their lives in the First World War.

In total, 1,400 bell ringers died - including a number from Derbyshire.

Ringing Remembers is a nation-wide campaign to recruit 1,400 new bell ringers in their honour to ring in November 2018 for the centenary of the Armistice.

Churches across the Diocese of Derby are recruiting now.

Bell ringing is an inclusive community with people of all faiths and none, and there is no need to be musical or strong. It is a family-friendly, social activity that is good for you and your church community:

  • For all ages (10+), teens and adults
  • Children and parents/carers can learn togetherGreat all-year round exercise for the mind and body
  • Builds teamwork and leadership skills as part of a friendly team
  • Opportunities to visit new places and try new things.

Recent recruits have said:

“It forces me to go out, exercise my mind and my body and there’s something about being part of a group of people that have a focus and it’s very satisfying to be a part of that. It’s not that hard to learn – the more you practise the easier it gets, but personally I find it very enjoyable and I look forward to coming to practise.” - an adult bell ringer.

“Bell ringing has helped me with my shyness – I’ve had to conduct and shout at people I don’t know so it’s taught me to speak up a bit. It’s helped me build my teamwork skills too when I’m doing complicated patterns. I want to try and carry it on because it’s a fun thing to do. People are nice and everyone is involved with what’s going on." - a teenage bell ringer.

Would you like to come along and play a part in it?

To get involved visit a100.cccbr.org.uk

Find us on Facebook: BellRingingDerbyshire

 

IMG 8963 preview.jpegThe Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern, Bishop of Derby, has received the Langton Award for Community Service, for national and international work in combating human trafficking and modern slavery.

Bishop Alastair, who will retire later this year, was honoured by Archbishop Justin Welby at Lambeth Palace on Friday.

The citation on the Archbishop of Canterbury's website reads: "Alastair Redfern has been the Archbishop of Canterbury’s representative for combating modern slavery, both nationally and internationally, for a number of years.

"As a member of the House of Lords, he was on the Select Committee that scrutinised the draft Modern Slavery Bill and worked exceptionally hard to take it through Parliament for enactment in 2015. This was only the second piece of anti-slavery legislation in British history since 1807 and the first in Europe."

It concludes: "Alastair Redfern has made an outstanding personal contribution to the Church of England and wider society in combating modern slavery."

Bishop Alastair founded the Clewer Initiative, a national project linked to the Church of England, working with dioceses to tackle modern slavery. 

Read the full citation here

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The Diocese of Derby

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