Study for a Certificate in Theology, Mission & Ministry* starting autumn 2018

(Cost = FREE) 

Course Description

The Certificate of Higher Education in Theology, Ministry and Mission gives you opportunity to go further, deeper & broader in your understanding of the Christian faith.

bible coffee 238711 unsplashThe course is designed primarily for participants preparing for, or already involved in, licensed Christian ministry or service.

However, the programme is equally suitable for all students wishing to learn at an advanced level for whatever reason.

This is a vocational award offered by the University of Durham (Common Awards) through the All Saints Centre for Mission & Ministry (ASC) in partnership with the Diocese of Derby. 

This part-time course is available in Derby & (subject to numbers) Chesterfield.

Entrance Requirements

Entry to the programme is flexible, depending on your experience and education.

Study towards the Certificate requires the preparation of assessed work. You are most likely to flourish if you already have study skills at 'A' level.

That said, support and advice is available to all students and a passion to learn is clearly the most important requirement.

You will need to demonstrate your potential to benefit from study at this level.

There will be a low-key interview with ASC at the beginning of the course to help you decide which route to take: 'audited' (no formal assessment) or 'for credit'.

Only 'for credit' students will be awarded the Certificate, which is the first step towards a Bachelor's degree.

Credits earned through study for the Certificate can be used towards further advanced study that could lead to a BA.

Much of the learning material used in the course is available online and so basic IT skills and access to the internet would be a distinct advantage.

Learning Programme

bible study 556522 unsplashCandidates for the Certificate need to attend learning hubs where facilitated learning is delivered.

These groups will be in Derby and, subject to the minimum number of participants joining the course, also in Chesterfield. 

To gain a Certificate, you must complete 120 credits.

Termly modules follow the same format: a combination of online study through an e-learning site, discussion groups once a week, 'Study Days' (Saturdays) led by the Module leader, independent reading, learning and reflection and two written assessments.

You should be prepared to commit about 100-120 hours of study per module.

The modules:  2018-19:          Theology & Practice                                        (20 credits)

                                                Introduction to the New Testament              (20 credits)

                                                Call & Vocation                                               (20 credits)

                                                

                        2019-20:          Mission & Evangelism                                    (20 credits)

                                                Introduction to the Old Testament                (20 credits)

                                                Christian Doctrine and History                       (20 credits)

 

Key Dates (2018)

Induction:        Tuesday, 11th September, 7.15pm, St Barnabas Centre, Danesmoor

Study Days:     22nd September, 12th January, 18th May

 

Venues

Derby, St. Peter's, Wednesday evenings (7.15pm - 9.15pm)

Chesterfield, Wingerworth Church Centre, Monday evenings (7.15-9.15pm) 

 

Course Details

Cost:    This course is offered FREE to participants by the Diocese of Derby. 

            To study towards the same qualification at a university would cost £000's!

 

Apply

For more information or to apply to join the course contact:

Dr Esther Elliott, director of studies

esther.elliott@derby.anglican.org | 01332 388674

Fiona Bennett, lay ministry administrator            

fiona.bennett@derby.anglican.org | 01332 388670

 

*(formally known as Transforming Faith)

 

Children and groups across the Diocese have received their Bishop's Badge awards from Bishop Alastair and Bishop Jan.

These awards are a version of the Bishop's Badge awards that were extended to Church Schools to mark the 90th anniversary of the diocese. Schools were invited to nominate the child in their school who they feel best embodies the Diocesan Church School value of the Year, community, in an age-appropriate way.

Nineteen individuals were nominated for a Bishop’s Badge from fifteen different church schools.

>> Pictures from the award presentation at Derby Cathedral (on Flickr)

>> Pictures from the award presentation at St John's Tideswell (on Flickr)

Several children were nominated for their work raising funds for charity – Rosie baked and sold cakes to buy mosquito nets, Joshua and Lily raised money to support two different linked slum schools in Kolkata, Maiya supports Sheffield Hospital Charities, Esme helped fund the rescuing of rabbits while Ryan supported the work of the Stroke Association after his Grandma died and Daisy and Tyler both support the Red Cross shop in Matlock to make people smile.

Helping other children fit into school and make friends and giving up their playtime to help and support other children and staff were the reasons Tillie, Liam, Millie, Rufus, Matthew, Riley and Lily Rose were put forward for an award.

Lauren and Ruby were chosen because of their talent in spotting, naming, encouraging and nominating for awards other children who embody the school’s values.

Ruby volunteers with Derbyshire Volunteer Police Cadets, in residential homes and at a Christmas soup lunch. Katie used her first aid skills to save her Grandma’s life when she was choking at a restaurant.

Rosie and Corey are involved in waste recycling projects and litter picking and Amelie brings beauty to the community through the school gardening club and flower festivals .

These awards were presented by Bishop Alastair at a special celebration at Derby Cathedral and by Bishop Jan at St John's Tideswell at services planned and led by children from Longford C of E Primary School at the Cathedral and Bishop Pursglove C of E Primary School in Tideswell.

Tideswell Badge awards

Bishop's Badge School awards in Tideswell

Both schools planned very imaginative and creative worship using various media and resources including a live fig tree, golden magic pennies, a values quiz, large paper people, action prayers and songs and even a Tibetan prayer bowl to help us explore the theme of Christian community in our worship.

Alongside the awards for individuals, six separate projects received awards. Bishop Pursglove C of E Primary School had been doing some joint partnership work with a local residential home including  the children sharing work about WW2 in the residential home and the elderly people visiting school for an art exhibition.

Darley Churchtown C of E Primary School have also been working with the elderly, sharing artwork, crafts and music with dementia patients in their Ringing the Changes Project  through the auspices of First Taste Charity as well as running a community café to raise funds for their local church.

Newbold C of E School have formed their own Early help Team to offer family support to all these needing support along the lines of play therapy, emotional literacy, pet therapy and access to the Foodbank. St Luke’s C of E Primary School have been giving posies of flowers and gratitude messages to members of the community they consider to be unsung heroes.

Carsington and Hopton C of E primary School have been raising funds to buy resources and uniforms for their link school in Kolkata and one of their teachers Mrs Tinkler has written a phonics teaching manual which fifteen of the schools in Kolkata are now using each day.

Following the success of these new awards, we shall be inviting awards for next year for children and projects embodying the Diocesan Church School value of hope.


When the Diocese of Derby was founded in 1927, Bishop Edmund Courtenay Pearce – the first Bishop of Derby – arranged for a medal to be struck and copies presented to distinguished members of the Diocese and to all those being confirmed in that year.

In more recent years, Bishop Alastair arranged for a replica of this medal to be minted and mounted in the form of a badge to be awarded to lay people across the diocese each year to acknowledge outstanding service to the mission and ministry of the church.

To mark the 90th Anniversary of the Diocese of Derby, these awards were extended to Church Schools who were invited to nominate the child in their school who they feel best embodies the Diocesan Church School value of the Year, community,  in an age-appropriate way.

There was also a category for projects where schools were creating and building community and these projects were awarded a Certificate of Excellence.

The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, has paid tribute to The Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern, Bishop of Derby, who retires at the end of August after 13 years in the Diocese.

In a speech delivered at General Synod, the Archbishop talked about Bishop Alastair's commitment to the Diocese of Derby in the deaneries and in schools.

archbishop of york john sentamuArchbishop John (pictured right) said: "Alastair, you have overseen the development of new ‘super deaneries’ in the diocese where the area deans are paid half-time in that role (with the other half of the stipend for their parish ministry).

"I understand it has been a joy to see the eight area deans grow into their leadership roles and plan mission and ministry locally and contextually.

"You have spoken time and time again of the mission opportunities our church schools afford and have built up a first-rate team under an outstanding Director of Education."

Archbishop John also cited Bishop Alastair's work in the fight against human trafficking: "Of course, Alastair we are all impressed with the work you have done to highlight the horror that is modern slavery and the huge amount of effort you have given to leading on this area not only for the Church of England but for all denominations to ensure this matter is taken seriously."

He concluded by saying: "Your vast wisdom and deep spiritual leadership will be greatly missed both in the Diocese and in the life of the national church."

Read Archbishop John's tribute in full

Bishop Alastair has ordained eight new deacons in Derby Cathedral.

The eight men and women have begun ministry as deacons in parish churches across the Diocese of Derby following a service on Sunday, 1 July in Derby Cathedral.

The special service was lead by the Bishop of Derby, the Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern.

The new deacons include a former IT project manager, an international business director and former teachers.

Rod Prince, Amanda Marshall, Bruce Johnson, Jan Hutchinson, Caro Hemmings, Joel Bird, Carolyn Baker and Jill Hancock will now start a three-to-four-year post of curate, training alongside experienced vicars.

Deacons are normally ordained as priests after a year.

For more pictures, please see us on Flickr.

 

 

Around 5,000 clay figures, depicting players and spectators of Ashbourne’s Shrovetide football game, have gone on display in St Oswald’s church in the town.

The ‘Our Game’ project, launched by Ashbourne Festival and The Clayrooms, is the culmination of four months’ work involving more than 2,000 school children and hundreds of adults from communities in and around Ashbourne.

Between them they have created the individual small clay figures, which have been installed in the church and will remain there until September.

The figures include players in the hug, followers of the game, mums carrying babies and even some ‘out-of-town’ characters, such as Gandalf and ET. Each figure is unique and has its own character.

The Revd Duncan Ballard, vicar of St Oswald’s said: “In a fast-changing, busy world some communities struggle to retain their identity; however, Ashbourne is a place where tradition, community and pride come together every year for Shrovetide Football.

“It’s therefore very fitting that the clay figures, symbolically representing the whole of the town, have found a home surrounding the high altar at St Oswald’s church.

“St Oswald’s church is delighted to be a part of this project, demonstrating that the church is here for everyone, and that our doors will always be wide open.”

This ambitious project was developed for the Ashbourne Festival in partnership with The Clayrooms pottery in Ashbourne. Local ceramicists and teachers, Helen Cammiss and Sarah Heaton, who founded the pottery last year, originated the idea for ‘Our Game’.

 

st oswald clay figures 6895 full res

The 5,000 small figures have been created by schoolchildren, local residents and visitors during school visits, ‘pop-up’ workshops and in The Clayrooms studio.

It represents the sense of community involvement and inclusiveness and, of course, the pride in celebrating ‘Our Game’ shown by every maker of every figure.

To top off the centrepiece of the ‘hug’, a special ‘Our Game’ ball has been painted by Shrovetide ball painter Tim Baker.

ballot 253360 unsplash

Elections for the new, three-year session of the Diocesan Synod are now taking place.

The Diocesan Synod is the main forum for discussion on Diocesan policy and its members are also members of the Diocesan Board of Finance which deals with financial matters relating to the Diocese.

If you would like to be nominated for election to Diocesan Synod please contact a Deanery Synod member in your parish, or your incumbent, if you are a member of the laity, and you will be guided through the process.

Any confirmed person who is on the electoral roll of a parish within the Diocese is eligible for nomination, although it is the membership of the deanery synods which is the electorate.

Clergy who are members of a deanery synod are eligible for nomination also.

Nominations close on 22nd June, elections will take place by 10th July and the new Diocesan Synod comes in to being on 1st August.

When it comes to getting married, not every bride can tie the knot in their first choice of church. One lucky bride who did is Kelly Hewitt.

As did her mum. And her grandmother. And her great grandma and three previous generations before her.

It’s understood that no fewer than seven generations of Kelly’s family have taken their vows in Tissington parish church - St Mary’s. For some reason, brides-to-be just seem to want to get married there.

The small village of Tissington is nestled in the western part of the Diocese - around 160 people live in the parish as a whole (Tissington and Lea Hall). Kelly was born and baptised there before tying the knot there in 2017.

“I’ve always been part of the church and would not have wanted to marry anywhere else,” she said.

“In fact, I remember telling Chris, ‘if you don’t marry me in Tissington church, I won’t marry you at all!’”

But as well as being her parish church, St Mary’s holds another special significance for Kelly.

Sadly, Kelly’s dad, Paul Greatorex, died suddenly when she was only 9 – and he is buried at the church.

She recalls: “After he died, Mum wanted to get something for the church where they had got married.

She decided on a kneeler and an Advent wreath and I used the kneeler at my wedding. “The vicar, Carollyn McDonald, then took the wreath and placed a lighted candle in it in remembrance of my dad.”

It was Kelly’s granddad, Kenneth Unwin, who also married in St Mary’s in 1966, that gave her away – so for Kelly, it was like the church had brought them all together again: “It was very emotional – though I managed to hold it together!

“It was the most lovely day and it really felt like Dad was present.”

For Kelly’s mum, Wendy, it was an emotional day, too: “The memories came flooding back, but I felt really proud of the way I’d brought her up and that she married in the same church as me.

“I would always tell people to marry in church. It’s part of my faith and, to me, you’re not getting married unless you’re in a church.”

You can read more about Kelly and Wendy in the first issue of Together Magazine - available free in churches in the Diocese of Derby from 1st May.

Tissington church interior

Inside Tissington church

IMG 8963 preview.jpegThe Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern, Bishop of Derby, has received the Langton Award for Community Service, for national and international work in combating human trafficking and modern slavery.

Bishop Alastair, who will retire later this year, was honoured by Archbishop Justin Welby at Lambeth Palace on Friday.

The citation on the Archbishop of Canterbury's website reads: "Alastair Redfern has been the Archbishop of Canterbury’s representative for combating modern slavery, both nationally and internationally, for a number of years.

"As a member of the House of Lords, he was on the Select Committee that scrutinised the draft Modern Slavery Bill and worked exceptionally hard to take it through Parliament for enactment in 2015. This was only the second piece of anti-slavery legislation in British history since 1807 and the first in Europe."

It concludes: "Alastair Redfern has made an outstanding personal contribution to the Church of England and wider society in combating modern slavery."

Bishop Alastair founded the Clewer Initiative, a national project linked to the Church of England, working with dioceses to tackle modern slavery. 

Read the full citation here

Poppy opening 2 1500 72dpi socialA unique poppy memorial has been unveiled in Chesterfield's Crooked Spire.

Chesterfield Parish Church has partnered with the Royal British Legion to commemorate the 1,574 soldiers from Chesterfield killed in the First World War. 

To mark the centenary of the end of the war, local volunteers have knitted an individual poppy for each serviceperson from the town who gave their life.

The 1,574 poppies have been pieced together to create a magnificent handcrafted sculpture, hanging in the medieval church.

The cascade of flowers was formally blessed and opened by Revd Patrick Coleman, vicar of Chesterfield, on Saturday with Councillor Maureen Davenport, the mayor of Chesterfield, in attendance.

Speaking at the opening ceremony, Revd Patrick Coleman said: “This display is an important remembrance of the ultimate sacrifice made by over 1,500 people from this town - around one in seventy of the local population at the time.

“It also gives us, today, the opportunity to pledge to redouble our resolve to pray and work for peace, so that this disastrous loss of life isn’t repeated.

“I thank all the volunteers – aged from 18 months to over 90 – for creating this poignant piece of art.” 

The poppy installation can be viewed whenever the church is open.

Opening times are from 9 am to 4 pm Monday to Saturday (closing is at 6pm on Thursdays), and for services at 10.30 am and 6.30 pm on Sundays.

See also: The Crooked Spire | Follow the Crooked Spire on Facebook

 

OldBramptonRingers RingingChamber brightChurches across the Diocese of Derby are recruiting new bell ringers as part of a nationwide campaign to honour the ringers who lost their lives in the First World War.

In total, 1,400 bell ringers died - including a number from Derbyshire.

Ringing Remembers is a nation-wide campaign to recruit 1,400 new bell ringers in their honour to ring in November 2018 for the centenary of the Armistice.

Churches across the Diocese of Derby are recruiting now.

Bell ringing is an inclusive community with people of all faiths and none, and there is no need to be musical or strong. It is a family-friendly, social activity that is good for you and your church community:

  • For all ages (10+), teens and adults
  • Children and parents/carers can learn togetherGreat all-year round exercise for the mind and body
  • Builds teamwork and leadership skills as part of a friendly team
  • Opportunities to visit new places and try new things.

Recent recruits have said:

“It forces me to go out, exercise my mind and my body and there’s something about being part of a group of people that have a focus and it’s very satisfying to be a part of that. It’s not that hard to learn – the more you practise the easier it gets, but personally I find it very enjoyable and I look forward to coming to practise.” - an adult bell ringer.

“Bell ringing has helped me with my shyness – I’ve had to conduct and shout at people I don’t know so it’s taught me to speak up a bit. It’s helped me build my teamwork skills too when I’m doing complicated patterns. I want to try and carry it on because it’s a fun thing to do. People are nice and everyone is involved with what’s going on." - a teenage bell ringer.

Would you like to come along and play a part in it?

To get involved visit a100.cccbr.org.uk

Find us on Facebook: BellRingingDerbyshire

 

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The Diocese of Derby

Contact Us

Derby Church House

Full Street, Derby DE1 3DR

01332 388650 (reception)

Church House reception: 

enquiries@derby.anglican.org